The beginnings of a better Auburn Trail

Trudy (left) and Katie, regular dog walkers on the Auburn Trail. Although they feel the Whole Foods project is too expansive, they were Trudy and Katie were pleased to learn the Auburn Trail improvements would include their favorite stretch. [Photo: David Kramer, 2/16/19]

At the Elmwood intersection. Trudy (left) and Katie, regular dog walkers on the Auburn Trail. Although thinking the Whole Foods project is too expansive, Trudy and Katie were pleased to learn about the Auburn Trail improvements that include their favorite stretch. [Photo: David Kramer, 2/16/19]

As described in Demolition of Mario’s restaurant begins (D & C), yesterday workers began razing the former Mario’s restaurant marking the beginning of the 10-acre Whole Foods Plaza project.

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Behind the former Mario’s restaurant in Brighton on the trail off Allen’s Creek Road [Photos: David Kramer, 2/15/19]

Admittedly, I have not paid close attention to the project — and its controversies. Not a big shopper, the planned businesses will probably not effect me one way or the other.

One aspect of the project will enhance my — and fellow pedestrians and bicyclists — quality of life: the planned improvements to the former Auburn rail line.

As described by William Moehle, Brighton town supervisor in a Brighton-Pittsford Post July 13th, 2018 opinion piece, From the Supervisor: Update on proposed Whole Foods Plaza:

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The Harley School scoreboard just a baseball throw away from the Auburn Trail. [Photo: David Kramer, 2/16/19]

The developer will build the Auburn Trail, from the Pittsford town line to Highland Avenue, nearly 2 miles. The trail will be a 10-foot-wide, multi-use bicycle/pedestrian ADA-accessible trail. Currently, most of the former Auburn rail line is undeveloped, without legal right of public access, but as part of the project, the developer will acquire the right for the public to use the land.

Right now, the two mile stretch is a pleasant spot to walk. In the summer, I enjoy stopping at Harley’s baseball field to watch the Rochester Men’s Adult Baseball League.

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Behind the former Mario’s restaurant in Brighton on the trail off Allen’s Creek Road [Photo: David Kramer, 2/15/19]

However, as well as not being ADA accessible, parts of the stretch are rock strewn, bumpy and actually dangerous to bike.  As seen in the PRIVATE PROPERY sign, the section behind the former Mario’s and Clover Lanes is not publicly accessible and those who use that section anyway encounter crumbling asphalt.

For Roadbikereview.com, in “Rail Trails of Rochester: NYC Auburn road trail,” a road biker, calling himself No Time Toulouse, provides a comprehensive depiction of the stretch to be improved. No Time chronicles its rough going — and he is an experienced road biker.  (See link for all photos and text)

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(top) “From Elmwood south, the surface is a lot rougher, being just a thin layer of moss/grass over straight ballast. The pic is taken behind the Harley school fields, southward, the second northward.” (middle and bottom) “Asphalt stretch, behind the church on one side, and the old bowling alley on the other side. Alas, they have chained up a gate, and I had to detour over a small path to get around and over to Clover St.” From Roadbikereview.com

I am looking forward to the new trail, just as the Brickyard Trail enhanced the quality of life in Brighton and for all who use it.

SEE ALSO

On the trail behind Cobbs Hill Village

More on how the Sandra L. Frankel Nature Park came to be

ON BRIGHTON

Site says Brighton is best place to live in New York

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