Illuminating western and central New York history through Phillumeny

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Another phenomenon, still more strikingly modern, was a package of lucifer matches, which, in old times, would have been thought actually to borrow their instantaneous flame from the nether fires of Tophet.

― Nathaniel Hawthorne, The House of the Seven Gables (1851)

Last week, in Exploring my Scottish Roots at Cazenovia’s Brea Loch Inn George Cassidy Payne took us on a charming tour of the Brea Loch Inn. George’s montage reminded me that about ten years ago at a garage sale I bought a large bagful of matchbooks and some matchboxes collected possibly in the 1960s, but mostly in the 1970s and 1980s and perhaps part of the 1990s (with one wedding matchbook dating back to 1956) —  until now mostly forgotten in the attic.

The technical term for matchbook and matchbox collecting is Phillumeny. The hobby was especially popular from the 1960s through the 1980s. Several factors led to the decline of phillumeny. Smoking in general decreased while bans on restaurant and bar smoking increased.  At the same time, smokers mostly switched to disposable butane lighters. Many businesses stopped offering matchbooks altogether. In addition, bulky cardboard matchboxes with less distinct images and much poorer quality of print were widely introduced — to the dismay of phillumenists who revel in the distinct and varied matchbook aesthetic.

I can’t recall exactly where or from whom I bought the matchbooks for less than five dollars.  The seller was not the collector; I vaguely recall the seller mentioning the collector had died and no one wanted to keep the collection, itself a potential fire hazard.

Going through the matchbooks was a poignant experience. Perhaps the collector hoped a family member would continue the tradition, no doubt a labor of love. Now, here were the matchbooks, being sold to a stranger for basically a song. (On ebay, I discovered none of the books have a value of more than three dollars and most have none.)

The matchbooks offer a glimpse into someone’s life many decades ago.  I imagine the matchbooks were mementos kept by a couple to chronicle their scenic journeys.  Most of the books are from the Finger Lakes region where I assume they lived, possibly in Rochester where I bought them. One book is from the Rochester Marine Midland Bank that ceased operations in 1999.

The couple’s taste ran from folksy restaurants and diners to quaint inns, at least three of which are haunted. I can see them taking weekend getaways, soaking in the rich history of central and western New York.  They mainly stayed in New York except for several trips to rural Connecticut, where perhaps they had family or a child in college. The couple did go once to the Grand Canyon, Arizona and Hawaii and once out of the country to Toronto.¹

About half the inns and restaurants still exist.

15 shores

Long a western NY icon, Shore’s Orchard Downs Restaurant was demolished in 2001.

2001

circa 1960. Photo from Orchard Park (NY) (Images of America) 2003 by Suzanne S. Kulp

Village Inn, Massena, NY

Village Inn, Massena, NY (closed in 2017)

My favorite restaurant in Massena - so sad they are closing. :( A long-time Massena landmark will be closing at the end of the year, The Village Inn. They have had a long, successful history in Massena and I am very sad to see them close. Generations of Casselmans have enjoyed many happy times, celebrations, and just great dinners at the Cecots' restaurant. Tonight I had dinner there with a wonderful friend, Judith. It was excellent as usual. I had the Mussels as an appetizer, with a fresh, garlic broth. I could have used the entire bread basket sopping that up. :) Followed that up with the St. Lawrence Perch. Always one of the best dishes, the breading is so light and crispy. Topped it off with a piece of lemon meringue pie, which really brought back the family memories…it was my favorite that my grandmother used to make, and this one was perfectly tart. Shawna and Cathy - once again an excellent meal; Sara - thank you for top notch service. I'll be back a couple of times before I leave for the summer (please don't close)!! :)

A 2017 comment on tripadvisor.com. “My favorite restaurant in Massena – so sad they are closing. 🙁 A long-time Massena landmark will be closing at the end of the year, The Village Inn. They have had a long, successful history in Massena and I am very sad to see them close. Generations of Casselmans have enjoyed many happy times, celebrations, and just great dinners at the Cecots’ restaurant. Tonight I had dinner there with a wonderful friend, Judith. It was excellent as usual. I had the Mussels as an appetizer, with a fresh, garlic broth. I could have used the entire bread basket sopping that up. 🙂 Followed that up with the St. Lawrence Perch. Always one of the best dishes, the breading is so light and crispy. Topped it off with a piece of lemon meringue pie, which really brought back the family memories…it was my favorite that my grandmother used to make, and this one was perfectly tart. Shawna and Cathy – once again an excellent meal; Sara – thank you for top notch service. I’ll be back a couple of times before I leave for the summer (please don’t close)!! :)”

Golden Buck, Ovid, NY

Golden Buck, Ovid, NY

So many locals love the Golden Buck in Ovid, NY. There are fancier places, ones that are more costly, but "the Buck" is a favorite for good fare in an unpretentious atmosphere. There are specials every night offered at very reasonable prices. This is a great value not too far from the hustle/bustle of the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. BizBuySell

Customer review from tripadvisor.com, “So many locals love the Golden Buck in Ovid, NY. There are fancier places, ones that are more costly, but “the Buck” is a favorite for good fare in an unpretentious atmosphere. There are specials every night offered at very reasonable prices. This is a great value not too far from the hustle/bustle of the Seneca Lake Wine Trail.” [Photo: BizBuySell]

Glen Iris Inn, Letchworth Park, Castile, NY

Glen Iris Inn, Letchworth Park, Castile, NY

1200px-Glen_Iris_Inn

The Glen Iris Inn, William Pryor Letchworth’s former home, is located on the top of a cliff overlooking Middle Falls in Letchworth State Park, New York State, USA. William Letchworth found the day-to-day operations of business burdensome and so sought refuge from the business world and decided to build a home; he settled on the location while as a tourist gazing at the view in what the Seneca Indians called the Sehgahunda Valley through which the Genesee River flowed. In 1859 he purchased his first tract of land near Portage Falls. Letchworth hired noted landscape architect William Webster to design the grounds of the estate, which Letchworth named Glen Iris after the Greek goddess of rainbows. Webster and some special guests would eventually plant huge varieties of differing trees and flowering bushes throughout the park, including white and red pines, oaks, and dogwoods. He bequeathed his 1,000-acre (4 km2) estate to New York in 1906, which now forms the heart of Letchworth State Park. In 1914 Letchworth’s home became a country inn and grew to become the center of a thriving state park. (Wikipedia)

The Holloway House, East Bloomfield, NY

The Holloway House, East Bloomfield, NY

ince 1808 this fine dining restaurant in a colonial dwelling in Bloomfield, NY has catered to those in quest of great food, served in a quiet and restful atmosphere in the Finger Lakes Region of NY.

Since 1808 this fine dining restaurant in a colonial dwelling in Bloomfield, NY has catered to those in quest of great food, served in a quiet and restful atmosphere in the Finger Lakes Region of NY. (thehollowayhouse.com)

Crystal Barn, Pittsford, NY

Crystal Barn, Pittsford, NY

The Crystal Barn Restaurant in Pittsford, a fixture for years among fine-dining establishments in the Rochester area, is on the market.

As reported in a 2010 Rochester Business Journal article, “The Crystal Barn Restaurant in Pittsford, a fixture for years among fine-dining establishments in the Rochester area, is on the market.” The restaurant never reopened.

Avon Inn, Avon, NY

Avon Inn, Avon, NY

Local historians maintain that if the history of the Genesee Valley had never been written, it could easily have been recreated from the reflective history of the Avon Inn. Built circa 1840, this beautiful Greek revival structure was initially the residence of Jonathan H. Gerry, a successful grower of broom corn. After 1866, it was operated as a health center that was well known from Maine to Florida. Water from the sulfur springs was used to treat rheumatism, neuralgia, malaria and other conditions. Among many “firsts,” the Avon Inn had the first central heating system in the Genesee Valley; the first elevator in upstate New York; and was the site of the first bank and post office of Livingston County. The wealthy and the famous were often guests at the Avon Inn. Some of these well-known personages were George Eastman, Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Harvey Firestone, Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, General Jonathan M. Wainwright, Corregidor hero of World War II and Katharine Hepburn. Beginning as early as 1883, the Avon Inn was featured in many newspapers and magazine articles, both locally and nationally. In February 1979, the Avon Inn was extensively damaged by a fire. The fire destroyed the 3rd floor, which was added on in the earlier years as a health resort. The Inn was restored after two years of extensive renovations by then owner Frank Csapo. The property was then sold to Linda Moran who successfully operated the Inn for 34 years until her retirement in 2016. Which brings us to present day. The Inn is again being renovated (2017) and reopened its doors in 2018 under new ownership. The Inn features a newly designed ballroom to host special events, corporate retreats and weddings of up to 200 guests. Fourteen boutique style hotel rooms are also available. Both guests of the hotel and the local community will be able to enjoy casual dining in the bar/tavern area as well as the expansive wrap-around porch.

Local historians maintain that if the history of the Genesee Valley had never been written, it could easily have been recreated from the reflective history of the Avon Inn. Built circa 1840, this beautiful Greek revival structure was initially the residence of Jonathan H. Gerry, a successful grower of broom corn. After 1866, it was operated as a health center that was well known from Maine to Florida. Water from the sulfur springs was used to treat rheumatism, neuralgia, malaria and other conditions. Among many “firsts,” the Avon Inn had the first central heating system in the Genesee Valley; the first elevator in upstate New York; and was the site of the first bank and post office of Livingston County. The wealthy and the famous were often guests at the Avon Inn. Some of these well-known personages were George Eastman, Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Harvey Firestone, Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, General Jonathan M. Wainwright, Corregidor hero of World War II and Katharine Hepburn. Beginning as early as 1883, the Avon Inn was featured in many newspapers and magazine articles, both locally and nationally. In February 1979, the Avon Inn was extensively damaged by a fire. The fire destroyed the 3rd floor, which was added on in the earlier years as a health resort. The Inn was restored after two years of extensive renovations by then owner Frank Csapo. The property was then sold to Linda Moran who successfully operated the Inn for 34 years until her retirement in 2016. Which brings us to present day. The Inn is again being renovated (2017) and reopened its doors in 2018 under new ownership. The Inn features a newly designed ballroom to host special events, corporate retreats and weddings of up to 200 guests. Fourteen boutique style hotel rooms are also available. Both guests of the hotel and the local community will be able to enjoy casual dining in the bar/tavern area as well as the expansive wrap-around porch. (avoninnny.com)

Aurora Inn, Cayuga, NY

Aurora Inn, Cayuga, NY

Set on the shores of Cayuga Lake amidst a tiny, heritage village in the heart of the Finger Lakes, the Aurora Inn and its lakeside dining room has a pedigree dating back to 1833. The original country inn has been impeccably restored to appeal to today's most discerning guests. The Aurora Inn has all the intimacy of a bed and breakfast with services and amenities that only a luxury hotel can offer. TripAdvisor

Set on the shores of Cayuga Lake amidst a tiny, heritage village in the heart of the Finger Lakes, the Aurora Inn and its lakeside dining room has a pedigree dating back to 1833. The original country inn has been impeccably restored to appeal to today’s most discerning guests. The Aurora Inn has all the intimacy of a bed and breakfast with services and amenities that only a luxury hotel can offer. (TripAdvisor.com)

Mancusco's Restaurant, Batavia, NY (closed)

Mancusco’s Restaurant, Batavia, NY. According to a 1970 New York Time‘s article, Mancusco’s apparently was a mafia hangout: “BATAVIA, N.Y. June 2, June 3 ,1970 Four Mafia members, including two who had attended the 1957 gangland gathering at Apalachin, N. Y., were arrested at lunch here today in Mancuso’s Restaurant. Two men who were lunching with them also were taken into custody by the police. The six were charged with loitering, after refusing at first to identify themselves or to give the reasons for Their get together, according to the state police. They were arraigned be fore City Judge Charles Graney and released in $50 bail each for a hearing next Monday.”

BATAVIA, N.S. June 2 Four Mafia members, including two who had attended the 1957 gangland gathering at Apa lachin, N. Y., were arrested at lunch here today in Mancuso's Restaurant. Two men who were lunching with them also were taken into custody by the po lice. The six were charged with loitering, after refusing at first to identify themselves or to give the reasons for Their get together, according to the state police. They were arraigned be fore City Judge Charles Graney and released in $50 bail each for a hearing next Monday. June 3 , 1970

After Mancusco’s closed, it became T.F. Brown’s. Mancusco’s memorabilia is still on the walls. T.F. Brown’s ©Howard Owen

14 origina

The Original HamThatAmHam Restaurant, Chittenango, NY. Established in 1910, The Original later became the Blue Barbeque which closed within the last ten years.

now the Blue Barbeque. ebay

Vintage postcard, ebay

6. Bearlsley

Beardsley Manor, Little Falls, NY

Beardslee Manor is the restaurant inside. Beardslee Castle, a three-story castle in Little Falls, New York, USA, constructed in 1860 as a replica of an Irish castle, and currently used as a restaurant. The manor has been rebuilt twice, after having been burned down by fires in 1919 and 1989.[1] Beardslee Castle was the project of widowed Lavina (Pardee) Beardslee, began in her latter years around the late 1790s. Her son, Augustus Beardslee, is credited with the building of the Castle, though it was Lavina's grandson, Capt. Guy Roosevelt Beardslee (who was born in the mansion), that oversaw the completion of the project circa 1860. Capt. Beardslee undertook a business project obtaining electricity and a generator with a distribution system beginning a small local hydro-power plant. This small company succeeded into the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation.

Beardslee Manor is the restaurant inside Beardslee Castle, a three-story castle in Little Falls, New York, USA constructed in 1860 as a replica of an Irish castle. The manor has been rebuilt twice, after having been burned down by fires in 1919 and 1989.  (Wikipedia). The castle is well known to be haunted.  According to lite987.com, “Throughout Central New York there are countless haunted historic sites that have fallen from public recognition. While not every historic site is haunted and not every haunted location is historic there are large numbers of sites that have found their way back into the public consciousness due to their paranormal activity. One of the most renowned historic locations in the region also known for its haunting is Beardslee Castle. Built in the 1860’s by Augustus Beardslee in Little Falls, the manor was designed to imitate Irish castles. It wasn’t until 1983 when owner Joe Casillo brought in a ghost hunter to investigate the manor was there a mention of the paranormal at the site. The ghost hunter captured strange voices on their recorder and promptly shared these findings with all of the local media. The accounts garnered attention for years until the manor burned for the second time in 1989.”

Belhurst Castle, Geneva, NY

Belhurst Castle, Geneva, NY

In discussing the topic of haunted locations one of the most cliched and iconic spots for a haunting is that of a castle. The imagery of a European castle silhouetted against a stormy sky brings to mind classic horror stories from Dracula to Frankenstein and not without just cause. In Europe castles are some of the longest standing structures with a bloody history that lends to extensive accounts of paranormal activity. Haunted castles are not limited to Europe however; there are hundreds of castles throughout the United States with 14 of the most prominent castles in New York. One local haunted castle is Belhurst Castle in Geneva.

According to lite987.com, “In discussing the topic of haunted locations one of the most cliched and iconic spots for a haunting is that of a castle. The imagery of a European castle silhouetted against a stormy sky brings to mind classic horror stories from Dracula to Frankenstein and not without just cause. In Europe castles are some of the longest standing structures with a bloody history that lends to extensive accounts of paranormal activity. Haunted castles are not limited to Europe however; there are hundreds of castles throughout the United States with 14 of the most prominent castles in New York. One local haunted castle is Belhurst Castle in Geneva.” [Photo: beardsleecastle.com]

The Sherwood Inn, Skaneateles, NY

The Sherwood Inn, Skaneateles, NY

Built as a stagecoach stop in 1807, the Sherwood Inn has been a favorite resting place for travelers and locals for over two centuries.

Built as a stagecoach stop in 1807, the Sherwood Inn has been a favorite resting place for travelers and locals for over two centuries. The Inn has been meticulously restored to the beauty of a bygone era with four fireplaces, pegged wood floors, antique furniture and fine wood detailing to create a relaxing harmony away from everyday cares. (Skaneateles.com)

16 elbridge

Weber’s Wayside Inn, Elbridge, NY

Wayside Irish Pub from Haunted History Trail The original building or "Munro House" was built in the 1800s. Reports of ghostly activity at the location date back to at least the 1960s. While the building was closed after a second fire, a passerby looking in the windows saw a transparent woman in a long dress on the stairs. There have been numerous reports of the apparition "Sara" since this event. Sara is believed to be the young girl who hung herself on the third floor. Since the 1960s there have been many sightings of various ghostly beings and reports of paranormal events in the building. Most of the poltergeist-like activity is attributed to a friendly ghost named Harry. However, there are other ghosts also thought to be spending their afterlife in the building. They include the Inn's original owner, Squire Munro, and an unknown traveler who died in the building. Multiple reports from employees and patrons tell of a male figure dressed in a soldier uniform, and shadow figures in the basement. Many of our patrons and bartenders have felt "touches", "pokes", and "cold" spots. It is not unusual to have a female patron complain of having her hair tugged on with no one around her. You are also liable to have a glass fly off the bar without explanation. Pictures just might drop off the walls or an orb may show up in a photo you have taken here.

Wayside Irish Pub [Photo: HauntedHistoryTrail.com] According to waysideirishpub.weebly.com, “The original building or “Munro House” was built in the 1800s. Reports of ghostly activity at the location date back to at least the 1960s. While the building was closed after a second fire, a passerby looking in the windows saw a transparent woman in a long dress on the stairs. There have been numerous reports of the apparition “Sara” since this event. Sara is believed to be the young girl who hung herself on the third floor. Since the 1960s there have been many sightings of various ghostly beings and reports of paranormal events in the building. Most of the poltergeist-like activity is attributed to a friendly ghost named Harry. However, there are other ghosts also thought to be spending their afterlife in the building. They include the Inn’s original owner, Squire Munro, and an unknown traveler who died in the building. Multiple reports from employees and patrons tell of a male figure dressed in a soldier uniform, and shadow figures in the basement. Many of our patrons and bartenders have felt “touches”, “pokes”, and “cold” spots. It is not unusual to have a female patron complain of having her hair tugged on with no one around her. You are also liable to have a glass fly off the bar without explanation. Pictures just might drop off the walls or an orb may show up in a photo you have taken here.”

1. Remington's

Remington’s, Merchants Road, Rochester, NY

2. Remington's

Remington’s. [Photo: David Kramer, 3/14/19]

Chase's Family Restaurant, Waterloo, NY

Chase’s Family Restaurant, Waterloo, NY. Russ and Betty Pelow owned and operated the restaurant from 1954 to 1979 and died respectively in 2009 and 2010.

CHASE'S FAMILY RESTAURANT, WaterlooSeneca Falls, NEW YORK USA unused postcard

CHASE’S FAMILY RESTAURANT, Waterloo/Seneca Falls, NEW YORK USA unused postcard (ebay)

The "Big Elms" Victorian, Hornell, NY

The “Big Elms” Victorian, Hornell, NY. In 1974, the “Big Elms” closed and the Italian Villa opened on the location.

196 Seneca St. - Hornell, N.Y. Since 1925 One of New York State's finest restaurants. Over 50 years of fine food service. Beautifully decorated in antiques of the Victorian Era. A favorite place for dining and parties. "The Fawcetts" C.E. Hughes Photography Serving the area's truly authentic Italian favorites since 1958. Our specialties are family recipes handed down from our grandparents who immigrated from the Aubruzzi Region of Italy. Today, the 3rd generation of the Argentieri Family continues the tradition.

Vintage photo of the “Big Elms” (flickr.com) “196 Seneca St. – Hornell, N.Y. Since 1925 One of New York State’s finest restaurants. Over 50 years of fine food service. Beautifully decorated in antiques of the Victorian Era. A favorite place for dining and parties. “The Fawcetts” C.E. Hughes Photography”

3. Plums-beafsteaki

I found next to nothing on these gone restaurants. Plums was last mentioned in the Democrat and Chronicle in 1989; Beafsteak Mining Company in 1999. There are a couple of references to the Boardwalk Café from people who worked there in the 70s or 80s.

¹ I found an intriguing clue as to who originally owned the matchbooks. On the Grand Canyon book is a signature from a woman, now deceased, who lived in Town of Campbell northwest of Corning.  I learned that her husband, coincidentally, now lives in Rochester only a block and a half away from me.  I wondered what the man knew about the signature on the Grand Canyon book and if his late wife — or himself — was the collector.  The man was intrigued by the matchbook but said he didn’t know why his wife’s signature was on the book. The man said neither he nor his wife collected matchbooks. It’s a mystery.

SEE ALSO Local philatelist faults Talker’s Edgerton Park hoopla. Et tu,Tucker?