An eerie quiet at Nazareth College

An eerie quiet at Nazareth College

4/15/20. Nazareth College. Chairs and tables in the Natapow Quad [Photos: David Kramer]

At the tail end of Wednesday’s snow shower, I visited Nazareth College’s idyllic campus. Along with a handful of cars in otherwise deserted parking lots, in my 20 – 25 minute stay I saw 4 people: three maintenance workers and one security officer.

Clock Tower and bike rack at the Natapow Quad. At 12:25 p.m. EST, April 15th, 2020 not a soul was in sight.

I was the only non-worker seen by the maintenance men all morning. An eerie — if not melancholy — silence overhung the campus.

Parked next to the LaSalle Way

As seen in Nazareth College’s President Daan Braveman on defining moments and his own March on Washington, August 1963, you’ve been to Nazareth College with Talker many times, including going underground with President Braveman, playing the jester at the 2016 Exploring Elizabethan Culture exhibit at the Lorette Wilmot Library, and juggling plastic globes at the 6th annual Conference on Global Citizenship.

We’ve communed with Thomas Merton in the Thomas Merton Room at the 2015 The Hidden Wholeness: The Zen Photography of Thomas Merton exhibit, talked with Professor Harry Murray after a anti-drone march from Palmyra to Pittsford, hung out at the 2015 On a Planet in Peril and Our Moral Responsibility conference with Dr. Muhammad Shafiq, Executive Director of the Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue and Maggie Matthews, then-Hickey Center Student Coordinator, and discovered a totem pole’s missing bird’s head.

(left) bench and totem pole outside the York Wellness and Rehabilitation Institute, 4/15/20; (right) October, 2015, David Kramer with ceramic bird’s head since re-installed atop the pole [Photo Elizabeth Mott from Talker of the Town discovers a Totem pole’s missing bird’s head! With help from Nazareth College’s Department of Creative Arts Therapy

 In “normal times,” I occasionally stroll the campus and visit the Lorette Wilmot Library, having borrowing privileges from my time in its ASAP accreditation program (and an email address [email protected]). Of all the local libraries, only Lorette held Enda Walsh’s Once (2012), needed for a review of its performance at Geva.

Lorette Wilmot Library to the right.¹ Photo: Ian Richard Schaefer, 4/15/20, from An Eerie Quiet at Nazareth College, Part Two, by Ian Richard Schaefer

 

(right) Once (2012) by Enda Walsh. [Held at and scanned courtesy of Nazareth College’s Lorette Wilmot Library] From Geva’s Once and eastern European fatalism

(left) 4/15/20 benches at the LaSalle Way, Garen Peace Garden in background; (right) 5/24/16 right bench, Rick Reibstein, presenter at the Sacred Texts and Human Contexts conference from “Many different paths to restoration” at Nazareth College’s Symposium on Nature and Environment in World Religions

Looking at the Garen Peace Garden’s stone fountain and terrace

Walking through a relatively empty and silent campus is, of course, not a new experience. On a July evening during the lull between summer sessions, Nazareth is almost entirely deserted. But this solitary amble was uncannily different. School was in full session. Students and faculty were ZOOMing; the staff was working from home. The virtual cloud around me was buzzing with intellectual activity. But I could only imagine, not see, the hum. I dearly hope Nazareth returns to normal — including the inevitable mid-April snow flurry — soon. When only on a sultry summer night, no one is there.

See also An Eerie Quiet at Nazareth College, Part Two, by Ian Richard Schaefer

 

NOTE

¹ One reader reports back:

I enjoyed seeing these two articles and photos of a campus I love. It reminded me that one of these days I want to walk around Nazareth. I received my BS from Naz and when I saw your mention of the library I thought you’d find it interesting that I was in the reserve library when news of the shooting of JFK came…..always my answer to “where were you…”

An Eerie Quiet at Nazareth College, Part Two, by Ian Richard Schaefer

ON MCQUAID

An eerie quiet at McQuaid Jesuit High School in Brighton

ON NAZARETH

Nazareth College’s President Daan Braveman on defining moments and his own March on Washington, August 1963

On the Thomas Merton Room and the 100th Anniversary of his birth

A pilgrimage of peace from Palmyra to Pittsford

“Holocaust by Bullets” from Nazareth College

Talker of the Town discovers a Totem pole’s missing bird’s head! With help from Nazareth College’s Department of Creative Arts Therapy

Nazareth College’s first “Mini Chautauqua” opens a new conversation on an old theme: nurturing planet Earth

“Our armour all as strong, our cause the best:” The Golden Age of English history in full splendor at Nazareth’s Wilmot Library

“Many different paths to restoration” at Nazareth College’s Symposium on Nature and Environment in World Religions

About The Author

dkramer3@naz.edu

Welcome to Talker of the Town! My name is David Kramer. I have a Ph.D in English and teach at Keuka College. I am a former and still active Fellow at the Nazareth College Center for Public History. Over the years, I have taught at Monroe Community College, the Rochester Institute of Technology and St. John Fisher College. I have published numerous Guest Essays, Letters, Book Reviews and Opinion pieces in The New York Times, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, the Buffalo News, the Rochester Patriot, the Providence Journal, the Providence Business News, the Brown Alumni Magazine, the New London Day, the Boston Herald, the Messenger Post Newspapers, the Wedge, the Empty Closet, and the CITY.  My poetry appears in The Criterion: An International Journal in English and Rundenalia and my academic writing in War, Literature and the Arts and Twentieth Century Literary Criticism. Starting in February 2013, I wrote for three Democratic and Chronicle  blogs, "Make City Schools Better," "Unite Rochester," and the "Editorial Board." When my tenure at the D & C  ended, I wanted to continue conversations first begun there. And start new ones.  So we created this new space, Talker of the Town, where all are are invited to join. I don’t like to say these posts are “mine.” Very few of them are the sole product of my sometimes overheated imagination. Instead, I call them partnerships and collaborations. Or as they say in education, “peer group work.” Talker of the Town might better be Talkers of the Town. The blog won’t thrive without your leads, text, pictures, ideas, facebook shares, tweets, comments and criticisms.

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