The Brighton Farmer’s Market is back. At the Game at the Corners, the boys and girls of summer hoping to play ball.

The Brighton Farmer’s Market is back. At the Game at the Corners, the boys and girls of summer hoping to play ball.

Rochester City Court Judge Melissa Barrett. (left and center) Melissa, I swear I am putting the money into the basket. At the Brighton Farmer’s Market after the Game at the Corners, summer 2016; (right) Melissa at the Rochester Public Market, 9/7/19. See  On the electoral road with Melissa Barrett

On summer Sundays at the Brighton High School and the Brighton Middle School, two long standing traditions offer musical pleasure, fresh food and sporting exercise: the Brighton Farmer’s Market and the Game at the Corners. (SEE ALL GAME ARTICLES BELOW)

Both traditions started — or will start — late this year. On the first week, the 24th, the Brighton Farmer’s Market operated on a pre-order, pick-up basis. Happily on Sunday, May 31, onsite sales were allowed with safety precautions.  Soon, live music, Ask a Scientist and Ask a Bighton Town Council member kiosks, R Community Bikes giveaways and much more will be back.

The Brighton Farmers’ Market is sponsored by the Town of Brighton, and is a weekly, producer-only market. The market was founded in 2008 as part of the Town’s Color Brighton Green initiative, which was established to promote environmental sustainability among Brighton residents and businesses.

May 24th, 2020 at the Brighton Farmer’s Market. (left) Ronnie McClive, Le Petit Poutine [Photo: David Kramer]; (right) David Kramer smiling [Photo: Market assistant Julia who said it was a great first day]

The Brighton Farmers’ Market was formed to bring the pleasures of eating local food to the residents of Brighton and nearby communities. By connecting consumers to the farmers who grow food in an environmentally sound manner, the market can enhance the well-being of the consumers, the farmers, and the greater community. Buying delicious vegetables, fruit, and meat directly from local farmers allows us to reconnect with the source of our food and participate more fully in a sustainable food system. The market also offers plants, eggs, flowers, baked goods, honey, maple syrup, pasta, mixes, and herbal products. Visiting the market gives us a chance to meet friends and neighbors, listen to live music, and enjoy a cup of coffee on a summer morning.

5/31/20, Brighton Farmer’s Market (left) Brighton Town Supervisor William Moehle; (right) David Kramer in Red Wings cap with Silver Stadium memorabilia. Glove signed by Hall of Famers Cal Ripken Jr. and then-Rochester manager Frank Robinson at the 1988 Orioles-Red Wings 1988 exhibition game. Ball signed in 1977 by Hall of Famer Bob Feller. [Photos: Ripken and Mauler]

As seen in From Zimbabwe to Tokyo at the Brighton Farmers Market, the market is always a lively happening.

The Eastman Mbira Ensemble (l-r) Ken Luk, Julia Egan, Micah Schmidt, Jennifer Kyker (sitting) John Green and Rachel Orke 8/14/16 at the Brighton Farmer’s Market. From From Zimbabwe to Tokyo at the Brighton Farmers Market

 

(left) Jenny Frederick, Fellenz Family Farms; (right) David Kramer in front of Eastman Mbira Ensemble [Photo; Bev Gold] From From Zimbabwe to Tokyo at the Brighton Farmers Market

(left) (l-r) Yuko Goto, Go Goto, Shigeko Suzukli; (back), Susan Gardner-Smith, Director of the Town of Brighton Farmers Market; (front) and Ken Anno. From From Zimbabwe to Tokyo at the Brighton Farmers Market

Normally, the Game at the Corners begins in early May. Due to the pandemic, the game is on hold.  We hope to play this season but may be short handed.  We very much need new people to join the fun. Contact Dave Easan at [email protected] or Dave Kramer at [email protected].

In our first of many zany stories on the Game at the Corners, Pick up softball games still exist, unofficial commissioner Dave Esan explained what the game is all about.

The game has its roots in pick up games played 40 years ago at the Hillel School. The current Twelve Corners version has been running each summer since 1999. As families grew, the game disappeared.  It started again 16 years ago. The theme is to have fun, and hopefully to pass the love of softball to a younger generation. Special rules were created to allow 12-16 year olds to play without disrupting the game. Some have played with us from age 12 through college.

Opinion Page, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, June 2015. From Pick up softball games still exist

All are welcome. We gather between 9:15 – 9:30 a.m. Games go until 11:15 at the latest. Balls, bats and gloves, if needed, are provided. The Brighton Farmer’s is open both before and after the game. For questions, contact Dave Esan at [email protected]

Again, we may be short handed this summer and need all interested players. So please contact us if you want to have fun and pass the love of softball to a younger generation

At today’s market was Brighton Town Supervisor William “Mauler” Moehle who plans to throw out the ceremonial first pitch of the 2020 Game at the Corners season.

Brighton Town Supervisor William Moehle and with Spikes, the Red Wings’ mascot. Photo: David Kramer, May 1, 2016 from Iconic America at the Brighton Little League Parade

As seen in Iconic America at the Brighton Little League Parade, Bill played his Little League ball in Plymouth, Michigan and is a lifetime Detroit Tigers fan. When growing up, Bill’s favorite players were Al Kaline and Willie Horton. Kaline # 6, recently passed away, exemplified Detroit. Going directly from high school to the major leagues, Kaline played his entire 22 year career with the Tigers, leading them to the 1968 World Series title and winning the hearts of all Michigan.

For Bill, Horton symbolized the spirit of Detroit. Raised in Detroit, Horton starred at Northwestern H.S., hitting a home run at Tiger Stadium at age 16 in an all-city high school game and winning a city championship in 1959. During the city’s riots in the summer of 1967, wearing his Tiger uniform, Horton visited 12th Street calling for peace.

To keep sharp and to break in my new softball glove, I bounced and caught some balls off the wall of the Brighton High School, the “Brick Monster.”¹ Bill took a pic of an over-the-shoulder grab reminiscent of Willie May’s iconic catch of Vic Wertz’ drive to center field in game 1 of the 1954 World Series.

(left) May 31st, 2020. David “Say Hey Kid” Kramer [Photo: Mauler]; (right) September 29th, 1954. Willie “Say Hey Kid” Mays. With the game tied 2–2 in the eighth inning of Game 1 of the World Series, the Cleveland Indians had runners on first and second against the New York Giants. Cleveland’s Vic Wertz hit a 425-foot shot to center field, and Willie Mays sprinted towards the wall to track it down. Mays caught it over his shoulder, turned and gunned it back towards the infield, saving the runs. (Sports Illustrated)

In 2018, Brighton Town Council Member Robin Wilt threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

The Game at the Corners (left) Brighton Town Council Member and 25th State Congressional District candidate Robin Wilt [Photo: Nicholas Wilt]; (right) Robin hurling a strike to Neil Rogachevsky with Michael Raff manning second base, 5/6/18 Photo: David Kramer from Brighton Town Council Member Robin Wilt pitches in at the Game at the Corners

Be sure to make the Fourth of July game and the planned fireworks.

Celebrating the Fourth of July at the Game at the Corners. 

 

Shadi in front of American, Cuban and Canadian flags. I asked guys to bring appropriate flags for the celebration. But some of our players are geographically challenged. [Photo: Steve] 7/4/16 From Celebrating the Fourth of July at the Game at the Corners. And much more.

The Boys of Summer are back at The Corners

(left) Kid Hansen looking up at his Shot Heard ‘Round the Corners [Photo: ESPN photographer Kramer]; (right) Susan Gardiner-Smith, Director of the Town of Brighton Farmers Market, interviewed by Channel 8’s Abby Noble

(left) Kid Hansen scores! [Photo: ESPN photographer Kramer] Photos cropped with help from student worker Kelsi Barnholt at Nazareth College’s Wilmot Library 5/22/16; (right) (l-r) Eric Davidson, Barbara Johnson (behind David Kramer) and Rick Crummins, Brighton High School 5/22/16 [Photo: Channel 8’s Abby Noble] From The Boys of Summer are back at The Corners

Ball in creek disrupts Game at the Corners; Blake hits for the cycle

(left) l-r, Mike R. Joe, Dave K [Photo: Aaron Carter, 5/29/16]; (right) (l-r) Babak Elahi, David Kramer, Grant Cos at the Brighton Farmer’s Market 5/29/16

Who’s counting at the Game at the Corners

(l-r) Michaeal Raff, David Kramer, Mike Hansen, David Esan, Zev [Photo: Tom Hansen] 6/19/16 From Who’s counting at the Game at the Corners

BHS Concert Choir. Photo: Ian Stroszeck 6/19/16. From Who’s counting at the Game at the Corners

David Kramer. [Photo: Ian Stroszeck 6/19/16] From Who’s counting at the Game at the Corners

Casper scores the winning run at The Corners

Three sheets to the wind at Game at The Corners 6/5/16. From Casper scores the winning run at The Corners

(left) David Kramer and Brighton Town Supervisor William Moehle  [Photo: Nancy Gingold] 6/5/16]; (right) The Charlie Mitchell Band. Charlie Mitchell (front) sax, Richard Crummins, piano, Pat Parrien, drums, and Eric Davidson, bass. In rear, David Kramer [Photo: Nancy Rae Fox, 6/5/16] From Casper scores the winning run at The Corners

First Girls of Summer at the Game at the Corners; Talker wins it with three run walk off homerun

(top) Girl of Summer Anne hitting single; (bottom) Kylie hitting a single. [Photos: Bobry]

The Tree Shakers, Brighton Farmers Market 7/31/31 [Photo: Nancy Gingold]

Umpire added to Game at the Corners. Players subtracted

(left) Brandon “Lou Pienella” Davis; (right) Ben “Earl Weaver” Duchano [Photos: Scott] From Umpire added to Game at the Corners. Players subtracted

(left) Dean Tucker and offspring. Don’t even think about putting that picture in the magazine. [Photo: BFM paparazzi]; (right) Gregg Herman, piano; Kyle Vock, bass; Matt Bevan-Perkins, drums. Brighton Farmers Market 6/12/16 [Photo: Dean Tucker] From Umpire added to Game at the Corners. Players subtracted

“Crooked Arm” Brancato brings 19th Century base ball to the Game at the Corners

(left) No Glove Brancato and Glove Kramer at the Brighton Farmers Market 8/7/16 [Photo: Nancy Gingold; (right) Crooked Arm pitching barehanded in the 8/21/16 Game at the Corners [Photo: Anthony]

Farewell Boys and Girls of Summer! Under-40 MVP smashes 5 home runs off Over-40 MVP in Sunday finale

(top row) Terry, Sam, Howard, Charles, Scott, David Esan, Michael Bobry, Blake, Brad, Zev (bottom row) Kylie, Seth, Michael Raff, Joe, David Kramer (with ballot box), Neil [Photo: Helen (Howard’s wife, Sam’s mom) ] 9/04/16. From Farewell Boys and Girls of Summer! Under-40 MVP smashes 5 home runs off Over-40 MVP in Sunday finale

(left) The Animal School [Photo: David Kramer]; (center) Talia and David Kramer [Photo: BFM volunteer] 8/28/16; (right) David Kramer [Photo: Dean Tucker, 9/4/16] From Farewell Boys and Girls of Summer! Under-40 MVP smashes 5 home runs off Over-40 MVP in Sunday finale

NOTE

¹ Bill’s throw to my glove was actually not just the first pitch of the season but the first catch ever for the glove.

As seen in In Brighton, the Meadowbrook neighborhood’s “Get Some Balls” sale goes virtual. It’s not for the birds., I traded the unsold baseballs Update, 5/18: After the baseballs did not sell, I traded them to Play It Again Sports in South Town Plaza for a new Rawlings® The Mark of a Pro ™ Player Preferred P130HFL 13 INCH All Leather Shell softball glove.

Unfortunately, the Sears Roebuck and Co, Master-Mixed, Boiled Linseed Oil saved to break in just such gloves is not the right kind of oil. While the container says, “Polishes and protects gun stocks, skis, toboggans and other sports equipment, according to baseballmonkey.com, “When using oils and conditioners to break in your glove, the first thing you should know is that products like Vaseline, petroleum jelly, olive oil, mink oil, and linseed oil should never be used.”

(left) Rawlings® The Mark of a Pro ™ Player Preferred P130HFL 13 INCH All Leather Shell softball glove; (right) Sears Roebuck and Co, Master-Mixed, Boiled Linseed Oil, One Quart, Laboratory Tested for Quality, Keep Out Of Reach Of Children. From In Brighton, the Meadowbrook neighborhood’s “Get Some Balls” sale goes virtual. It’s not for the birds.

“Breaking In” instructions included with Rawlings® The Mark of a Pro ™ Player Preferred P130HFL 13 INCH All Leather Shell softball glove. Left to right: English, French and Spanish. From In Brighton, the Meadowbrook neighborhood’s “Get Some Balls” sale goes virtual. It’s not for the birds.

OTHER GAMES 

Pick up softball games still exist

At Young Woman’s College Prep, Brad Rosenbaum aiming to hit 1.000

Who’s on first at the Game at the Corners? The Rabbi.

About The Author

dkramer3@naz.edu

Welcome to Talker of the Town! My name is David Kramer. I have a Ph.D in English and teach at Keuka College. I am a former and still active Fellow at the Nazareth College Center for Public History. Over the years, I have taught at Monroe Community College, the Rochester Institute of Technology and St. John Fisher College. I have published numerous Guest Essays, Letters, Book Reviews and Opinion pieces in The New York Times, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, the Buffalo News, the Rochester Patriot, the Providence Journal, the Providence Business News, the Brown Alumni Magazine, the New London Day, the Boston Herald, the Messenger Post Newspapers, the Wedge, the Empty Closet, and the CITY.  My poetry appears in The Criterion: An International Journal in English and Rundenalia and my academic writing in War, Literature and the Arts and Twentieth Century Literary Criticism. Starting in February 2013, I wrote for three Democratic and Chronicle  blogs, "Make City Schools Better," "Unite Rochester," and the "Editorial Board." When my tenure at the D & C  ended, I wanted to continue conversations first begun there. And start new ones.  So we created this new space, Talker of the Town, where all are are invited to join. I don’t like to say these posts are “mine.” Very few of them are the sole product of my sometimes overheated imagination. Instead, I call them partnerships and collaborations. Or as they say in education, “peer group work.” Talker of the Town might better be Talkers of the Town. The blog won’t thrive without your leads, text, pictures, ideas, facebook shares, tweets, comments and criticisms.

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