“When one goes down, ten go up” and restorative justice

“When one goes down, ten go up” and restorative justice

Olivia Kim, creator of the Douglass statues, 1 Tracy Street, 12/21/18 [Photo: David Kramer]

Olivia Kim, creator of the Douglass statues, 1 Tracy Street, 12/21/18 [Photo: David Kramer] See Vandalism of Douglass Statue Underscores St. John Fisher College’s Lack of Diversity

Two dimwitted alleged vandals unwittingly brought together a large gathering of Rochesterians in a celebration of art, community and history.

On Thursday at the corner of Alexander and Tracy, more than one hundred people witnessed the re-dedication of a new statue of Frederick Douglass replacing the original monument allegedly ruined by two St. John Fisher students. 12 similar statues are placed around Rochester on sites historically linked to Douglass.

Many radio, tv, online and print journalists covered the event

Many radio, tv, online and print journalists covered the event.

Among others, Carvin Eison and Bleu Cease, Co-Directors of the Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass Project, spoke. Eric Daniels and Tian Stephens, alumni of the Frederick Douglass Club at School 12, read a letter Douglass wrote about the rejection of his daughter by the Seward Seminary that once stood on the site.

carvin blue 1

Bleu Cease at the podium; behind Carvin Eisen, Eric Daniels and Tian Stephens

Carvin Eisen at the podium; behind Bleu Cease, Eric Daniels and Tian Stephens

Carvin Eisen at the podium; behind Bleu Cease, Eric Daniels and Tian Stephens

First revving up the crowd with a call and response — “When I say FREDERICK, you say DOUGLASS” — Carvin set the tone of the afternoon by declaring, “When one [statue] goes down, ten go up.” Carvin wished we actually had the resources for ten new monuments, but the symbolic connection between the statues and a rising up of the community was powerful.  Carvin also reminded us that before Rochester was the city of George Eastman it was the city of Frederick Douglass.

It was about that time when I heard someone in a passing car yell something to the effect of “throw ’em all in jail.”  Next to me was Shanda who also heard the shout.  We weren’t sure exactly what we had heard, but Shanda worried the shout was a negative gesture toward the gathering. Later, I spoke with Xavier from 103.9 WDKX’s The Wake Up Club who interviewed me for his program.

(left) Shanda; (right) Xavier

(left) Shanda; (right) Xavier. Hear Xavier’s interview with me on 103.9 WDKX’s The Wake Up Club

Xavier, along with two city workers who were closer to the scene, were pretty sure the call was for a stiff punishment — jail time — for the vandals.

While many in the audience might like to see the perpetrators face imprisonment, I was reminded of project manager Christine Christopher’s earlier statement that now is the time to set aside anger. Instead, the destruction of the monument can be a teachable moment.

The incident and its aftermath is a moment for restorative justice, as defined by The Centre for Justice & Reconciliation:

Restorative justice repairs the harm caused by crime. When victims, offenders and community members meet to decide how to do that, the results can be transformational.

I asked Olivia Kim, the creator of the statues, what might be suitable punishment.  First, Olivia explained that discussions are being held surrounding payment for a new sculpture. She spent approximately 220 hrs over the course of two weeks on making, teaching/directing volunteers to produce one sculpture.  Olivia had 4-8 volunteers helping each day during a 6 day work week.

At the same time, along with financial compensation, Olivia is open to restorative interventions. The project itself was not possible without the work of close to 140 volunteers. Olivia would welcome an offer by the men to be trained — as were the volunteers — to help create sculptures. In turn, they could direct others.

The experience might transform the young men. And maybe we could reach Carvin’s imagined goal of ten statues up for the one that went down.

[Photo: Carvin Eisen]

[Photo: Carvin Eisen]

See “Olivia Kim: Bringing Frederick Douglass to Life” in the South Wedge Quarterly‘s 2018 Holiday Edition

Gerard Rooney, president of St. John Fisher College also spoke.

It’s my commitment to you today that we as a campus community will earn the respect of the Rochester community…to restore the reputation of St. John Fisher College.

While the actions of a few do not represent the college as a whole, Rooney called for another form of restorative justice.

(left) David Kramer; (right) Gerald Rooney [Photo: Marion Romig]

(left) David Kramer; (right) Gerald Rooney [Photo: Marion Romig]

Later, I floated an idea past President Rooney.

SJF’s Library holds an extensive collection of Douglass’ newspapers.  As many of the papers are in poor condition, the students could repair or digitize as needed. They could create a power point presentation on their discoveries to be presented in RCSD schools. Rooney thinks the idea — in keeping with the transformational potential of restorative justice — is promising.

UPDATE: Lavery Library Director Melissa Jadlos informed me that the newspapers are now digitalized and can be found at the New York Heritage Digital Collection.

Displayed at Art of the Book: Artist Books and Altered Books at the Central Library of Rochester

Displayed at Art of the Book: Artist Books and Altered Books at the Central Library of Rochester. From Vandalism of Douglass Statue Underscores St. John Fisher College’s Lack of Diversity

SEE ALSO

Vandalism of Douglass Statue Underscores St. John Fisher College’s Lack of Diversity

About The Author

dkramer3@naz.edu

Welcome to Talker of the Town! My name is David Kramer. I have a Ph.D in English and teach at Keuka College. I am a former and still active Fellow at the Nazareth College Center for Public History. Over the years, I have taught at Monroe Community College, the Rochester Institute of Technology and St. John Fisher College. I have published numerous Guest Essays, Letters, Book Reviews and Opinion pieces in The New York Times, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, the Buffalo News, the Rochester Patriot, the Providence Journal, the Providence Business News, the Brown Alumni Magazine, the New London Day, the Boston Herald, the Messenger Post Newspapers, the Wedge, the Empty Closet, and the CITY.  My poetry appears in The Criterion: An International Journal in English and Rundenalia and my academic writing in War, Literature and the Arts and Twentieth Century Literary Criticism. Starting in February 2013, I wrote for three Democratic and Chronicle  blogs, "Make City Schools Better," "Unite Rochester," and the "Editorial Board." When my tenure at the D & C  ended, I wanted to continue conversations first begun there. And start new ones.  So we created this new space, Talker of the Town, where all are are invited to join. I don’t like to say these posts are “mine.” Very few of them are the sole product of my sometimes overheated imagination. Instead, I call them partnerships and collaborations. Or as they say in education, “peer group work.” Talker of the Town might better be Talkers of the Town. The blog won’t thrive without your leads, text, pictures, ideas, facebook shares, tweets, comments and criticisms.

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